15 Agosto 2018, 20:27:06 *
Bienvenido(a), Visitante. Por favor, ingresa o regístrate.

Ingresar con nombre de usuario, contraseña y duración de la sesión
Noticias: Foro RKKA
 
   Inicio   Ayuda Ingresar Registrarse  
Páginas: [1] 2   Ir Abajo
  Imprimir  
Autor Tema: Guerra del Golfo, 1990-1991. Un Análisis militar.  (Leído 1003 veces)
xammar
Colaborador portal RKKA
Mayor
*

Karma: 242
Mensajes: 571


« : 09 Junio 2014, 14:03:00 »

Para hablar del conflicto entre Iraq y los EEUU.

La visión estadounidense sobre las operaciones.

- The US Navy in Desert Shield and Desert Storm (1991)
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
- Analisis operacional de la guerra del golfo (1992)
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
- Centro de Historia militar del US Army (2010)
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
- Schwarzkopf and operation desert storm
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
- Desert Storm an analytical perspective ,by Carlo Kopp (1992/2005)
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar


Análisis estadounidense de la época reflexionando sobre como podía afectar a los soviéticos.

- Gulf War Forces Change in Soviet Defense Doctrine (1991)
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
- The Soviet Military and the New Air War in the Persian Gulf (1991)
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Análisis estadounidense sobre lo que 'opinaban los soviéticos' de la operación.

- Desert Storm: The Soviet View
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
- The soviet military views operation desert storm: a preliminary assessment
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Destaco un extracto escrito por el coronel David Glantz (experto en el frente oriental y el desempeño del RKKA durante la GGP) y que viene a resumir lo que opinaban los militares estadounidenses sobre lo que pensaban los militares soviéticos  Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar.
Citar
The Gulf War has fueled Soviet concerns regarding the nature and consequences of future war. Soviet observers commented extensively on the diplomatic and military deployment phases (August 1990-January 1991) and on the air war (January-February 1991), and have begun critiquing the short but violent ground phase. Although their judgments have often reflected a wide diversity of political views, arid some have been polemical in tone and unrealistic in content, these observers have begun identifying several important trends or tendencies which are worth, of deeper analysis.

Certainly the question of coalition-building and power projection heads the list of important Soviet concerns. Although they themselves contributed to the process, they were impressed by the ability of the U.S., within the context of the United Nations, to form a coalition from such diverse and often mutually hostile states. Observers have also noted U.S. ability to move a sizeable force to and, even more important, conduct an impressive logistical build-up in a distant region which lacked a well-developed communications infrastructure. Despite the fact that this process of "preparing a remote theater of military operations " took up to six months, the military results and political consequences of that feat will likely prompt increased concern on the part of those who, since Marshal Ogarkov's time, have warned of U.S. power projection capabilities.

To Soviet planners the most troubling trend was the seeming dominance of the battlefield, if not the theater as a whole, by modern technology in the form of hi8h-precision weapons Despite the predictable achievement by the Allies of total air superiority, the crushing weight of technology seemed to confirm the Soviet's worst fears -- that new high-precision weapons and weapons whose effect could not be readily predicted did, in fact, dominate and even alter the course and outcome of the subsequent ground war. These new weapons and, even more important, the systems employed to integrate them and older weapons in combat may, they fear, negate many more traditional measures of military power and have a revolutionary impact on future combined-arms concepts. The role of the Allied naval forces during active operations and as a means of deception will reinforce Soviet anxiety regarding the issue of naval power in warfare and insure that the U.S. Navy is a subject of future arms control negotiations.

Deception and surprise, in the Soviet view, played critical roles in both the air and ground phases of the war. This judgement reinforced the existing Soviet belief that recent technological developments have placed an even greater premium on the conduct of deception and the achievement of surprise. Both are absolute necessities if a state is to achieve success in future warfare. Early Soviet concerns that the Allies had not exploited the effects of the air campaign soon enough probably evaporated when the Allies ultimately did so quickly, effectively, and with practically no ground casualties. Soviet anxiety over the poor performance of specific Soviet weapons and integrating systems will probably pale beside their realization that modern high-precision weaponry, artfully and extensively applied, produced paralysis and utter defeat. Subsequent large- scale Allied conduct of successful operational maneuver sustained to great depths by an unprecedented logistical effort, combined with limited loss of materiel and weapons on the part of the attacker, will likely become major subjects of future Soviet study. While Soviets analyze these important issues, it is likely they will be plagued by the nagging questions, "Did not the air phase of the operation render all subsequent ground actions anti- climatic," and if so, "Why?."

Soviet planners certainly recognize the unique circumstances existing in the theater and asymmetries in forces, levels of modernization, and military competence between coalition and Iraqi military establishments. Nevertheless, in all probability the Allies ability to forge an effective combined effort and apply force efficiently in both the air and ground phases of the campaign has prompted concern in Soviet military and political circles. The unprecedented disruption of Iraq's military infrastructure, combined with extensive operational maneuver conducted within the context of the Airland Battle concept against Iraq's military center of gravity, seems to have confirmed Marshal Ogarkov's oft-expressed concern about a potential Soviet enemy's so-called war-winning potential in an initial period of any future war. Depending on one's political point of view, this will give cause for concern on the part of both those who have supported the concept of defensive sufficiency and those who have argued strenuously against it. The events of the Gulf War will likely, reinforce the arguments of reformers who have underscored the destructiveness and, hence, folly of future war. Conversely, it will serve as fodder for those who have argued against defensiveness or for greater defensive strength in light of what they perceive as a growing threat to the Soviet Union.

For the U.S., it would be a mistake to generalize from the experiences of the Gulf War and assume that the performance of the Iraqi Army with its predominantly Soviet equipment replicates how Soviet forces would operate in future war. The Iraqis did possess Soviet equipment, but did not employ it in a "Soviet manner." An over-arching system similar to that of the Soviets to integrate weaponry was noticeably absent. The result was the almost immediate loss of the air war and subsequent disaster.

Most Iraqi senior commanders, as Soviet critiques point out, were educated in Western or Indian staff colleges, while lower level commanders were Soviet educated. Much of the Soviet equipment performed well technically, and the Soviet military will not scrap the T-72 tank because its Iraqi crews chose to abandon them rather than fight.

Soviet military theorists are carefully studying the lessons of Operation Desert Storm and will continue to study them. While that study will be intense and the lessons learned will likely be extensive, the Soviets do not view the results of the war as an indictment of their weaponry or military methodologies. Rather, they will likely view the lessons of the war as an indictment of an inflexible Iraqi war leadership which failed to support its army adequately and gave short shrift to the vital issue of armed forces morale.

Y me parece una valoración de lo mas balanceada porque he leído algunos análisis de militares estadounidenses sobre lo que podía repercutir en los soviéticos que daba autentica vergüenza ajena (sovieticos en panico, incompetencia, que si el material militar era 'caca', etc.).

¿Alguien sabe si hay algún tipo de análisis sobre aquel enfrentamiento desde la perspectiva iraqui?.

Un saludo
En línea
alejandro_
Simple usuario
Mariscal
*

Karma: 479
Mensajes: 2888



WWW
« Respuesta #1 : 09 Junio 2014, 15:37:46 »

Citar
¿Alguien sabe si hay algún tipo de análisis sobre aquel enfrentamiento desde la perspectiva iraqui?.

Sí, hay una serie de entrevistas con altos mandos iraquíes tituladas "Project 1946", en referencia a las realizadas a oficiales alemanes tras la SGM. También hay análisis de Irak utilizando fuentes de ese país. Yo tengo varios pfd titulados:

- Iraqi Perspectives Project Phase II
- saddams-generals.pdf
- saddams-war.pdf

El material es más general y también cubre la Guerra Irán-Irak.

Saludos.
En línea
Bigshow
Moderator foro RKKA
Mariscal
*

Karma: 406
Mensajes: 3082



« Respuesta #2 : 09 Junio 2014, 16:17:35 »

Desgraciadamente no conozco recopilaciones con un estudio por parte del mando militar de Irak, pero creo que en los OPLAN estadounidenses referentes a la Península Arábiga de principios y mediados de los noventa podría haber menciones.

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
Destaco un extracto escrito por el coronel David Glantz (experto en el frente oriental y el desempeño del RKKA durante la GGP) y que viene a resumir lo que opinaban los militares estadounidenses sobre lo que pensaban los militares soviéticos  Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar.
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrarparece que a más de uno nos gusta Glantz. Aunque recuerdo que Isaev, que es un historiador ruso bastante respetado por otros miembros del foro, no lo dejaba en buen lugar.
En línea
xammar
Colaborador portal RKKA
Mayor
*

Karma: 242
Mensajes: 571


« Respuesta #3 : 09 Junio 2014, 20:35:04 »

Alejandro
Citar
Sí, hay una serie de entrevistas con altos mandos iraquíes tituladas "Project 1946", en referencia a las realizadas a oficiales alemanes tras la SGM. También hay análisis de Irak utilizando fuentes de ese país. Yo tengo varios pfd titulados:

- Iraqi Perspectives Project Phase II
- saddams-generals.pdf
- saddams-war.pdf

El material es más general y también cubre la Guerra Irán-Irak.
Gracias, ya me hecho con el material que recomiendas.

Bigshow
Citar
Aquí parece que a más de uno nos gusta Glantz. Aunque recuerdo que Isaev, que es un historiador ruso bastante respetado por otros miembros del foro, no lo dejaba en buen lugar.
A falta de poder acceder a fuentes rusas, en mi modesta opinion, la obra de David Glantz me parece bastante aceptable y ecuanime, vamos que no es un 'rusofobo' de manual. Tiene los tics clasicos que hay que asumir en un militar estadounidense pero a mi me parece un autor muy interesante y recomendable, por ejemplo, ''The Soviet Airborne Experience'' y su monográfico sobre la campaña de Manchuria de 1945 (August Storm) aun no he llegado a leerlos pero lo ponen bastante bien.

Un saludo
En línea
Lev Termen
Moderator foro RKKA
Capitan
*

Karma: 215
Mensajes: 377



« Respuesta #4 : 10 Junio 2014, 01:58:10 »

Seguro que es offtopic, pero... ¿quién recuerda el sitio web de información de GRU traducido al inglés durante el inicio de la segunda guerra del golfo (03/2003) que se llamaba Veni's aeronautics.ru? ...¿o algo así? Eran como partes de guerra y recuerdo que daba muy buena información que se podía corroborar con las noticias en prensa días más tarde.

Saludos,
En línea
Marcos
Moderator foro RKKA
Leytenant
*

Karma: 45
Mensajes: 96


« Respuesta #5 : 10 Junio 2014, 17:02:03 »

¿Sitio del GRU?

Si yo hago una página web, la alojo en Geocities (que tiempos...) y digo "página web no-oficial del GRU", ¿Mi página sería del GRU o incluso no oficial?.

Venik era un serbio que vivía en EEUU.
En línea
Lev Termen
Moderator foro RKKA
Capitan
*

Karma: 215
Mensajes: 377



« Respuesta #6 : 10 Junio 2014, 20:53:01 »

Ah, ¿entonces era un fake?

Gracias por la info!
En línea
Lavréntiy
Colaborador portal RKKA
Mariscal
*

Karma: 915
Mensajes: 6546


Narkom NKVD


« Respuesta #7 : 10 Junio 2014, 20:59:59 »

Citar
Aunque recuerdo que Isaev, que es un historiador ruso bastante respetado por otros miembros del foro

Aunque recuerdo otras cosas mucho peores dichas por otros miembros del foro.
En línea

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
Rusoargentino
Moderator
Mariscal
*

Karma: 1270
Mensajes: 5279


« Respuesta #8 : 16 Octubre 2017, 02:06:27 »

Mirando con más detalle algunos hilos que rara vez visito del foro, encontré este. Como saben en su momento investigué el tema junto con el iraquí Ahmad Sadik (que hizo la parte más importante y valiosa del estudio al investigar el lado iraquí), así que me parece más que adecuado volver a publicar aquí el artículo:


Desmitificando la Guerra del Golfo

La versión norteamericana de la Guerra del Golfo de 1991 ha sido contada casi mil veces en libros, documentales y filmes. Y por eso se la ha aceptado como una verdad irrefutable. Entre estas “verdades” hay varios mitos: que la Fuerza Aérea Iraquí no pudo derribar ningún avión de la Coalición, o que el misil de crucero Tomahawk fue el arma perfecta porque era ininterceptable y nunca erraba sus blancos, entre otros. Este artículo, escrito por el ex-miembro de la Fuerza de Defensa Iraquí Ahmad Sadik y el investigador Diego Zampini, demostrará que estos mitos poco tienen de verdad.

Eran las 11:30 hs del 19 de enero de 1991 cuando el Capitán Jameel Sayhood, del 6° Escuadrón de la Al Quwa Al Jowwiyah Al Iraqiya (Fuerza Aérea Iraquí, de ahora en más FAI) fue informado de que un ataque aéreo enemigo se aproximaba a su base base aérea, Al Qadiya. Sayhood se dirigió rápidamente al hangar reforzado de cemento donde se hallaba su avión, un caza MiG-29B. Al verlo llegar, sus mecánicos le saludaron atentamente, y él les devolvió el saludo. Acto seguido hizo una rápida inspección visual de la aeronave y su armamento. Su MiG-29B llevaba dos misiles de guía por radar R-27R (AA-10 Alamo para la OTAN) y dos misiles de guía infrarroja R-60MK (AA-8 Aphid). Subió por la escalerilla, se sentó en la cabina y verificó que todo funcionaba perfectamente.
Cuando despegó de su base a las 12:26 hs, Jameel esperaba encontrar a los intrusos rápidamente, ya que muy cerca de Al Qadiya, en la localidad de Hit, se encontraba un radar de fabricación soviética P-19, que estaba especializado en detectar aviones enemigos a muy baja altura. Tal como había pensado, poco después de despegar, el radar P-19 en Hit lo contactó y le dijo que mirara a su derecha y debajo. Sayhood así lo hizo, e inmediatamente encontró su objetivo: a medio kilómetro de distancia y a 70 metros de altura volaba un Tornado de la RAF británica. Otros tres Tornado volaban un poco más lejos. Sin encender su radar, Sayhood activó sus misiles R-60 y se alineó exactamente detrás del Tornado GR.1A S/N ZA467/FF del No.15 Sqdn, que nunca hizo ninguna maniobra evasiva, totalmente ignorante de la presencia del caza iraquí.  Pronto las letras cirílicas “ПР” (PR = Pusk Razresheniya = Permiso de Lanzamiento en ruso) comenzaron a parpadear en el vidrio de su HUD (Head-Up Display = Presentador Frontal), y al mismo tiempo Jameel escuchó un tono continuo en los auriculares de su casco ZSh-5. Un segundo después apretó el botón de disparo,  y vió como uno de sus R-60MK partía directo hacia el avión enemigo. Un cegador fogonazo en la cola del Tornado fue seguido por una enorme bola de fuego anaranjada en el suelo del desierto iraquí. Los desafortunados pilotos (Gary Lennox y Adrian Weeks) perecieron instantáneamente cuando su malograda aeronave se estrelló.  
Los pilotos de los otros tres Tornados nunca supieron que el MiG-29 del Capitán Sayhood estaba en el área, y honestamente creyeron que el aparato de Lennox y Weeks había sido abatido por un misil antiaéreo. Sayhood estaba dispuesto a aprovechar esto, y ya había comenzado a alinearse detrás del Tornado más cercano para abatirlo con otro R-60, cuando de pronto el GCI de Hit le informó de la presencia de otros aviones enemigos detrás y por encima de él. Era una pareja de cazas F-15C Eagle del 58º TFS/33ª TFW, tripulados por los Capitanes César Antonio Rodríguez (líder) y Craigh H. Underhill (numeral). Jameel vió la luz de su receptor de alerta radar SPO-15 estaba parpadeando, indicando que los cazas enemigos le habían lanzado misiles AIM-7M Sparrow. Sayhood notó la estela de ambos misiles acelerando hacía él desde arriba a la izquierda. Entonces realizó un giro muy cerrado, y la tremenda maniobrabilidad de su MiG-29B le permitió eludir el primer misil. Entonces el piloto iraquí activó sus misiles R-27R, giró hacia sus atacantes e incluso llegó a conseguir un lock-on en uno de ellos, cuando el segundo Sparrow le dio de lleno. Jameel decidió eyectarse inmediatamente, y segundos después ya flotaba en el aire. Desgraciadamente, debido a la relativamente baja altura de la eyección, se fracturó una pierna al tocar tierra. No pudo volver a volar y se retiró del servicio activo, pero no sin antes ser galardonado con dos medallas por su valentía, y ser ascendido al rango de Mayor.
Según la versión oficial de la Coalición sobre este combate, el Tornado de Lennox-Weeks fue abatido por un SAM, y los pilotos de F-15C Eagle derribaron dos MiG-29, Underhill primero y Rodríguez después. El relato de Jameel Sayhood, apoyado y confirmado por los operadores de radar en Hit y beduinos que estaban en la zona, corrige esta versión: el Tornado GR.1A fue en realidad derribado por el MiG-29B de Sayhood, que a su vez fue la única pérdida en combate aéreo iraquí del día – Jameel eludió el primer AIM-7 (el de Underhill) y fue derribado por el segundo (el de Rodríguez). Y tras analizar las fuentes iraquíes, este no es el único evento cuya versión oficial necesita ser corregida.

Victorias Aéreas Iraquíes

El combate relatado arriba revela que uno de los mitos más famosos de la Guerra del Golfo de 1991, que la FAI fue totalmente incapaz de de derribar o siquiera dañar a un solo avión de la Coalición, es completamente falso. De hecho, no menos de ocho aeronaves aliadas (seis estadounidenses, una británica y una italiana) fueron alcanzadas por misiles aire-aire disparados por cazas MiG iraquíes.
Cinco de estos incidentes tuvieron lugar durante la madrugada del 17 de enero de 1991, la primera noche de la Operación Desert Storm. Poco después de medianoche aviones del portaaviones USS Saratoga lanzaron un ataque contra la base aérea de Al-Waleed (conocida en Occidente como Tammuz). En la incursión participaban ocho A-6E Intruder del VA-35 Black Panthers y el VA-75, y eran escoltados por diez F/A-18C Hornet de los VFA-81 y 83 (además de cuatro F-14A Tomcat del VF-32 y tres aviones de guerra electrónica EA-6B Prowler del VAQ-130). Esperaban tomar a los iraquíes por sorpresa, pero lo que en realidad ocurrió es que no solo las defensas antiaéreas estaban alertadas, sino que reactores iraquíes realizaron un ataque en pinzas desde dos direcciones distintas contra la fuerza de ataque. Uno de los brazos de la pinza (un par de MiG-21bis) fue detectado con anticipación por un E-3 Sentry de la USAF y los Hornet del VFA-83 derribaron ambos con misiles Sparrow. Pero esas victorias fueron lo único que le salió bien al strike package naval esa noche, el resto fue un verdadero desastre.
El otro brazo de la pinza estaba compuesto por un único MiG-25PDS del 96° Escuadrón, con el Capitán Zuhair Dawood a los mandos, que despegó desde la base aérea de Qadisiyah. Este experimentado piloto de Foxbat mantuvo su radar apagado, confiando en el control terrestre iraquí para “rodear” a los Hornet del VFA-83 (a la izquierda/oeste de la formación naval) y colocarse detrás del ala derecha/este de los aviones del Saratoga: los cinco aparatos del VFA-81. El E-3 Sentry que detectó a los MiG-21bis no detectó al Foxbat ya que este estaba fuera de su alcance de detección. Ya perfectamente posicionado detrás de los Hornets del VFA-81, Zuhair Dawood encendió el radar de su MiG-25PDS, detectó un blanco a 25 kms adelante, y aprovechando la máxima velocidad de su aeronave (Mach 2,83 o 3.006 km/h) destruyó con un único misil R-40RD al F/A-18C BuNo 163484, matando instantáneamente a su piloto el Lieutenant Commander Michael S. Spiecher. Zuhair Dawood llegó incluso a continuación a “enganchar” su radar en un segundo blanco, un A-6E del VA-75 tripulado por el propio comandante del escuadrón, el Commander Robert Besal y su copiloto el Lieutenant Commander Michael Steinmetz, y pidió autorización para abrir fuego. Sabemos hoy que Dawood hubiera tenido tiempo de destruir ese Intruder sin problemas, porque solo en ese momento el E-3 Sentry lo detectó. Pero el control terrestre decidió  jugar a lo seguro, y le ordenó retirarse a máxima velocidad de vuelta a Qadisiyah. Fue una oportunidad desperdiciada que no volvería a repetirse…
Mientras tanto las defensas antiaéreas de la base masacraron a los Intruders del VA-35: una batería de Roland-2 al mando del Teniente Rabi derribó al A-6E de los Tenientes Jeffrey Zaun y Robert Wetzel (ambos fueron hechos prisioneros) y un ZSU-23-4 Shilka transformó en queso gruyere al A-6E BuNo 158539 (este aparato pudo regresar al Saratoga pero fue dado de baja como chatarra). Eso representaba el 25% de los ocho bombarderos (que hubiera subido al 30% si Dawood hubiera derribado a Basel-Steinmetz), un desastre bajo cualquier estándar de análisis. Fueron necesarios varios días para recomponer la moral de las tripulaciones navales de este portaaviones luego de tan desastroso bautismo de fuego sobre Iraq.
El Hornet de Speicher no fue la única víctima de los cazas iraquíes esa noche: tres F-111F Aardvark de la 48° TFW fueron dados de baja debido a los extensivos daños causados por los misiles aire-aire árabes, y un bombardero Stratofortress fue asimismo averiado. El primer Aardvark fue alcanzado a las 4:30 hs a unos dos kilómetros al sur de la base aérea de Balad (llamada Samara en Occidente) por un misil infrarrojo R-24T disparado por el Capitán Hussam, un piloto de MiG-23ML del 63° Escuadrón. A las 5:10 hs  otro MiG-23ML de la misma unidad lanzó otro R-24T que impactó en el F-111F BuNo 70-2384 sobre Salman Pak. La versión norteamericana de que los daños que causaron la baja de este avión fueron causados por la colisión accidental con el cisterna KC-135 que lo abastecía simplemente no tiene sentido: Salman Pak está solo 35 kms al sur de Bagdad – hubiera sido suicida enviar a un lento a indefenso cisterna tan cerca de la capital enemiga en esa primera noche, cuando las defensas antiaéreas iraquíes aún eran muy fuertes.
Pocos minutos después el Capitán Hudair Hijab, un piloto de MiG-29B del 6° Escuadrón, logró una doble hazaña: a las 5:20 hs, un poco al norte de Nujayb (cerca de la frontera entre Iraq y Arabia Saudita) lanzó un R-27R que dio de lleno en la sección de cola del B-52G BuNo 58-0248 de la 42ª BW, obligando a su piloto el Mayor Linwood Mason a realizar un aterrizaje de emergencia en Jeddah. Unos diez minutos más tarde Hiyab transformó un tercer F-111F en chatarra volante al alcanzarle con un R-60MK. Debe aquí notarse, que en el caso del Stratofortress, la explicación oficial que da la USAF sobre sus daños es muy contradictoria y cercana al ridículo: según esta, el bombardero fue alcanzado por un misil antirradar HARM disparado por un F-4G que accidentalmente se enganchó en el pequeño radar usado por el cañón trasero de 20 mm del B-52. Sin embargo, para que esto haya ocurrido así, es necesario que el F-4G haya estado atrás del bombardero. ¿Qué hacía allí, cuando normalmente los Wild Weasel V siempre iban por delante de los bombarderos para así neutralizar los sitios SAM que pudieran amenazarlos? Si esto último fuera lo correcto, la USAF necesitaría explicar como un misil lanzado por un avión situado delante del bombardero y yendo en la misma dirección súbitamente giró 180° y se dirigió hacia el B-52G.
Resumiendo, en total en la primera noche la guerra los cazas MiG iraquíes derribaron un Hornet, casi abaten un Intruder, dañaron sin reparación posible tres Aardvark, y averiaron seriamente a un Stratofortress. Una realidad que dista mucho de la afirmación estadounidense de que la FAI fue derrotada y quedó indefensa desde el comienzo del conflicto.
A estas victorias se agregarían tres más: dos Tornados el 18 y 19 de enero, y finalmente un F-15C el día 30 de enero. El Tornado IDS abatido el 18 de enero pertenecía al 36° Stormo de la AMI (Aviazione Militare Italiana), siendo su victimario un MiG-23ML del 63° Escuadrón, y el Tornado GR.1A abatido al día siguiente fue el de Lennox-Weeks a manos del MiG-29B de Jameel Sayhood, del cual ya hablamos. La victoria del 30 de enero de 1991 contra el F-15C fue lograda por un MiG-25PDS del 96° Escuadrón, y merece ser analizada en detalle. Este Foxbat tomó por sorpresa a un par de Eagles con un ataque a toda velocidad, e impactó al F-15C primero con un misil R-40RD de guía por radar, y luego con un R-40TD de guía por infrarrojos. De alguna manera el Eagle sobrevivió a ambos impactos pero fue observado ir en un pronunciado ángulo de descenso hacia la frontera saudita. Esta victoria fue considerada solo probable por la FAI hasta el verano de 1991, cuando un contrabandista beduino que guiaba una caravana entre Iraq y Arabia Saudita  informó haber encontrado los restos de un avión cerca de donde los operadores de radar habían visto al F-15 desaparecer de sus pantallas. Un equipo enviado a inspeccionar en secreto determinó que los restos eran en efecto de un F-15C Eagle, y que la metralla incrustada en lo poco que quedaba del fuselaje pertenecía a un R-40. El Gulf War Air Power Survey emitido por el Departamento de Defensa de EE UU indirectamente reconoce esta pérdida, aunque incorrectamente la lista como ocurrida el 22 de enero. Según este documento ese día un F-15C de la 1ª TFW fue destruido por “DEA-Other” (Direct Enemy Action – Other causes = Acción Directa del Enemigo – Otras causas), lo que significa que el avión se estrelló contra el suelo cuando intentaba eludir una amenaza enemiga, como por ejemplo un misil aire-aire.
La versión original norteamericana del resultado de los combates aéreos durante el conflicto puede resumirse como “36:0”. Esto es, la Coalición había destruido 36 aviones iraquíes en combate aéreo, y no había sufrido ninguna pérdida a manos de los cazas de la FAI. Treinta y una de estas victorias habían sido lograda por los cazas F-15C Eagle de la USAF, a saber: ocho MiG-23, seis Mirage F.1, cinco MiG-29, tres Su-22, dos MiG-25, dos MiG-21, dos Su-25, un Il-76 y tres helicópteros. Los F-15C de la Real Fuerza Aérea Saudita contribuían con dos Mirage F.1 adicionales, una tripulación de Strike Eagle de la 4ª TFW reclamaba haber destruido un Hughes MD-500 iraquí con una bomba inteligente Paveway mientras el helicóptero estaba volando en estacionario, y los Hornet del VFA-83 hacían su contribución final con los dos MiG-21 abatidos sobre H3.
Las victorias aéreas mencionadas anteriormente desmienten el “0” de este tan proclamado 36:0, y los registros de pérdidas de la FAI también desmienten el “36”: las pérdidas reales iraquíes en el aire fueron veintidós. Dieciocho de estas fueron a manos de los F-15C Eagle estadounidenses: tres Mirage F.1EQ-5, tres MiG-29B, dos MiG-25PDS y dos MiG-23ML en combate aéreo, más dos MiG-21bis, dos Su-25K y tres Su-22M3K durante los vuelos de transito de estos hacia territorio iraní, y finalmente un aparato de ala rotativa Mi-8. A estas hay que agregar los dos Mirage F.1EQ-5 abatidos por los Eagle saudíes, y los dos MiG-21bis derribados por los F/A-18C Hornet del Saratoga. Estas estadísticas alteran significativamente la relación derribos-pérdidas de 36:0 a solo un 22:7, o lo que es lo mismo, un más humilde 3:1. Ciertamente muestra la superioridad aérea de la Coalición, pero también muestra que los aviadores de la FAI no eran pichones o blancos estáticos solo esperando ser destruidos por los cazas aliados.

Neutralizando a los Tomahawk

El misil de crucero BGM-109 Tomahawk, también llamado TLAM (Tomahawk Land Attack Missile) era en 1991 una de las mejores armas del arsenal estadounidense. Sin embargo los planificadores de EE UU se encontraron con una gravísima cortapisa: el sistema de guía del Tomahawk, el que le daba su extraordinaria precisión, era en el ese momento el TERCOM (TERrain COntour Matching = Comparación del Contorno del Terreno), pero para funcionar correctamente este sistema necesitaba que los accidentes del terreno sobre el cual el misil iba a pasar tuvieran un gradiente mínimo de tres metros de altura. Por lo tanto el misil no puede atacar blancos… ¡sobre llanuras! Y los planificadores de EE UU descubrieron con frustración que el centro y occidente de Iraq es una vasta planicie, solo al oriente del país hay montañas.
Después de mucho trabajo, al fin dieron los cartógrafos estadounidenses con corredor de entrada viable por el cual los TLAM podían llegar hasta Bagdad: a través de la ciudad saudí de ArAr y luego la ruta Nujayb – Ramadi – Falluja – Abu Graihb y finalmente la capital iraquí. Como ruta alternativa a esta eligieron una que atravesaba el territorio iraní. Abadán – Dezful – Ilam – el pueblo iraquí de Ba’quba y Bagdad. Era una clara violación del espacio aéreo de Irán, pero el Pentágono decidió que los beneficios superaban los inconvenientes. A mediados de la década de 1990 fue introducido un nuevo modelo de Tomahawk equipado con GPS, y otras rutas de ingreso fueron utilizadas en 1996, 1998 y 2003. Pero como EE UU aún tenía almacenados en stock muchos de los misiles que usaban el TERCOM, estas dos rutas siguieron utilizándose.
Volvamos a 1991. Sin conocer los problemas del Tío Sam, los iraquíes sabían que tendrían que lidiar con estas muy precisas y casi indetectables armas, y empezaron a buscar formas de verlas venir primero, y destruirlas luego. Para lo primero la Al Difa’ Al Jowwi Al Iraqy (la Fuerza de Defensa Anti-Aérea Iraquí, a partir de ahora FDAAI) montó una simple pero confiable red de observadores terrestres que constaba de torres de vigilancia con seis u ocho personas dentro, equipadas con binoculares y radio o teléfono. Las citadas torres estaban distribuidas en tres anillos concéntricos: el primero sobre las fronteras de Iraq con todos sus países vecinos, el segundo a 150 kms dentro del territorio iraquí, y el último alrededor de los objetivos estratégicos. Los hombres en estos puestos avisarían inmediatamente  al CG de su unidad y de allí al CG Principal de la FDAAI si veían pasar los misiles. Esto no solo permitió a los iraquíes detectar la llegada de los TLAM, sino también estimar  cual era su posible objetivo.
La tarea de destruirlos fue asignada a una gran variedad de medios: ametralladoras y cañones antiaéreos rusos ZPU-14,5-4 y ZU-23-2 Serguey, y misiles infrarrojos portátiles Strela-2M (SA-7B para la OTAN), Strela-3 (SA-14) e Igla (SA-18), los cuales se desplegaron alrededor de los blancos clave, para evaluar su efectividad contra esta amenaza. Se desplegaron asimismo varias baterías SAM Euromissile Roland-2 y Osa-AK (SA-8 para la OTAN). Quedaba por ver si todas estas medidas realmente funcionarían o no. La espera terminó a las 2:35 hs del 17 de enero, cuando el Puesto N° 71 cerca de Nujayb vió pasar los primeros misiles, y pocas horas después la red de puntos de observación ya había determinado cuales eran los dos corredores de entrada de los BGM-109.
Para ejemplificar cuan eficiente se volvió la FDAAI destruyendo Tomahawks relataremos un incidente que tuvo lugar el 19 de enero de 1991. En las primeras horas de ese día el Mayor Hameed recibió órdenes de desplegar su pelotón de dieciséis soldados en la cresta de Habbaniya, no lejos de la enorme base aérea de Tammuz. Su pelotón contaba con cuatro de los novísimos 9K38 Igla. A Hameed le habían informado que se esperaba una oleada de misiles Tomahawk, pero cuando súbitamente apareció el primero, volando a 200 metros de altura y a 800 km/h, solo atinó a mirar en estado de total estupefacción. Seguía así cuando uno de los soldados gritó:
-¡Ahí viene otro en la misma dirección!!
Esta vez Hameed reaccionó inmediatamente y ordenó:
-¡Apúntenle y disparen!!
En menos de diez segundos el soldado a su lado había enganchado su Igla en el TLAM y disparó. El misil antiaéreo partió en persecución del segundo Tomahawk que se hallaba a menos de un kilómetro. Una pequeña nube de humo blanco surgió cuando el Igla golpeó al misil norteamericano, el cual se estrelló a pocos kilómetros de donde se hallaba el pelotón. Instantes después apareció un tercer TLAM desde la misma dirección, y fue inmediatamente derribado. De la misma manera fueron abatidos el cuarto y el quinto misiles. Una atmósfera de júbilo envolvió a Hameed y a todos los soldados del pelotón, que apenas podían creer lo fácil de derribar que era estos Tomahawk. Todos corrieron hacia donde yacían dispersos los restos de los cuatro misiles abatidos. Notaron que todas las partes electrónicas (incluido el TERCOM) estaban intactas. Los restos fueron despachados a Bagdad para ser analizados.
Escenas similares sucedieron alrededor de bases aéreas, cuarteles generales y otras instalaciones por todo Iraq que fueron blanco de ataques con BGM-109. Tras lidiar con los misiles de crucero durante tres días, la FDAAI rápidamente llegó a la conclusión que el mejor arma para destruir a los TLAM era el Igla soviético, que derribó a los Tomahawk literalmente como moscas. La única limitación del misil ruso era que no podían utilizarlo de noche. Pero aún en ese caso el Tomahawk no era inmune a la segunda mejor arma anti-TLAM iraquí: el Roland-2. Este sistema podía operar a toda hora, y se mostró tan letal contra el misil del Tío Sam durante la noche como el Igla lo era durante el día.
Este éxito de la FDAAI está indirectamente admitido por las propias fuentes estadounidenses. El 12 de junio de 1997 la US General Accounting Office publicó un muy interesante informe a pedido del congresista John D. Dingall llamado Operation Desert Storm, Evaluation of the Air Campaign (Operación Tormenta del Desierto, Evaluación de la Campaña Aérea), conocido también por su nombre clave GAO/NSIAD-97-134. En las páginas Nos. 142 y 143 este revelador informe establece:
[...] De los 288 lanzamientos, 6 sufrieron fallas de empuje y no hicieron la fase de trancisión a crucero. De los 282 que si lo hicieron, 22 eran TLAM D-II y 260 eran TLAM C y D-I . [...]
PERIODO DE LANZAMIENTO CONCENTRADO
Los lanzamientos de TLAM ocurrieron en su gran mayoría en los primeros tres días de la guerra. De los 260 TLAM C y D-I que hicieron la transición a crucero, más del 39% fueron lanzados en las primeras 24 horas; 62% lo fueron durante las primeras 48 horas; un poco más del 73% en las primeras 72 horas; y no se lanzaron más TLAM de ningún tipo después del 1° de febrero de 1991, solo dos semanas después del comienzo de la guerra. La CNA/DIA no ofreció ninguna explicación de porque no hubo más lanzamientos después del 1° de febrero.”

El párrafo más revelador de la página 143 del GAO/NSIAD-97-134 es este: "los análisis de posguerra del CNA/DIA han demostrado que hubo tantos TLAM C y D-I que fallaron en arribar a sus objetivos asignados –a los que se les da el término 'no shows' ('no se mostraron'), como aquellos que si impactaron en sus blancos." Si hubo tantos Tomahawk que dieron en sus blancos como aquellos no lo hicieron, quiere decir que alrededor de 140 TLAM fueron derribados por la FDAAI.
El informe no acredita explícitamente a la FDAAI como la principal causa de que tantos BGM-109 ‘no se mostraron’, pero cita (de nuevo en la página 143) los resultados de un ataque con Tomahawks a la base aérea de Rasheed cerca de Bagdad, que son reveladores: "el 1° de febrero seis TLAM C fueron disparados en salva, todos contra el aeródromo de Rasheed, estos llegaron a la zona de Bagdad a las 11 a.m., se disparó contra ellos, y solo dos de los seis llegaron al blanco.” Las palabras “se disparó contra ellos” significan que el Pentágono admite que esos cuatro misiles fueron abatidos por la FDAAI. De hecho, tras buscar información sobre este incidente en los documentos iraquíes, se pudo determinar que esos cuatro Tomahawks cayeron a manos de la Brigada de Roland-2 que defendía los talleres de reparación de la base aérea de Rasheed. Ahora sabemos porque “La CNA/DIA no ofreció ninguna explicación de porque no hubo más lanzamientos después del 1° de febrero.” No hubo más lanzamientos porque el Pentágono se dió cuenta que esto sería llanamente desperdiciar misiles – los iraquíes simplemente los derribarían a todos.

Los Espejismos de Tuwaitha

Otro mito de la guerra fue la afirmación de que los radares de las baterías SAM iraquíes fueron masacrados por los misiles antirradar AGM-88 HARM  de la Coalición, en particular los lanzados por los F-4G Wild Weasel V. De acuerdo a la USAF, la versión antirradar del Phantom dejó ciega e indefensa a la FDAAI desde el primer minuto de la guerra. ¿Es este mito verdad?
El Mayor Laith Yacub era el comandante de la 211ª Batería SAM, que defendía el complejo nuclear iraquí de Tuwaitha, conocido en Occidente como Osirak. La 211ª Batería estaba equipada con misiles antiaéreos de fabricación soviética S-125 Pechora (SA-3 Goa para la OTAN). Era parte del anillo defensivo del Proyecto 777 (el nombre código iraquí para su programa nuclear y Tuwaitha). Los medios de defensa del complejo eran pasivos y activos. Los primeros consistían en un muro de cien metros de altura que rodeaba todo el complejo, y máquinas para ocultar el reactor en construcción con una densa cortina de humo. Los medios activos comprendían seis baterías de S-125 (la del Mayor Yacub entre ellas) y ocho baterías de Roland-2, y cientos de cañones antiaéreos de 23, 37 y 57 mm todos situados encima del ya mencionado muro perimetral del complejo. Estas defensas estaban preparadas especialmente para repeler un gran ataque a baja altura, y asegurarse que la famosa incursión israelí del 7 de junio de 1981 no volviera a repetirse. Ahora, casi diez años más tarde, iban a enfrentar una incursión aún mayor a cargo de la mayor superpotencia del planeta, y el encargado de comandarlas en esta prueba suprema sería el Brigadier Naji Jalifa, un veterano de la guerra contra Irán.
Ya en octubre de 1990 el Brigadier Jalifa y los jefes de todas las baterías SAM S-125 que defendían Tuwaitha (incluido Yacub) recibieron visitas desde Bagdad: un equipo de especialistas en guerra electrónica enviados por el propio comandante en jefe de la FDAAI, Mayor General Muzahim Al-Hassan, y liderados por el Brigadier Nau’iemi. El equipo traía consigo doce dispositivos del tamaño de portafolios que debían ser colocados a razón de dos por cada batería de Pechora, y serian controlados a distancia por el jefe de cada batería desde su centro de control. Nau’iemi les informó que estos artefactos eran señuelos que engañarían a los misiles antirradar HARM. Nau’iemi había tomado los pequeños radares calculadores de distancia para los cañones de todos los MiG-21MF y Su-7BMK dados de baja por la FAI, y los reprogramó para que usaran la misma frecuencia de repetición de pulso y duración de pulso que los radares de los S-125.
Se construyeron unos 200 señuelos, que comenzaron a distribuirse entre las baterías de Pechora que defendían objetivos clave. La idea de Nau’iemi era que, cuando un ataque con misiles HARM fuera inminente, los jefes de las baterías encenderían los señuelos y apagarían el radar de sus baterías. Dado que los señuelos emitían igual que los radares de los S-125, los F-4G no notarían la diferencia y dispararían sus AGM-88 contra ellos. Cuando los misiles antirradar impactaran cerca de los señuelos, el jefe de batería los apagaría. Los pilotos de los Wild Weasel IV pensarían entonces que habían destruido los radares, y se retirarían. Cuando se aproximara la verdadera fuerza de ataque. Los jefes de batería volverían a encender los radares, sorprendiendo a los atacantes. Nau’iemi bautizó a sus dispositivos con el apropiado nombre de Sarab – espejismo en árabe.
A las 14:45 hs del 19 de enero de 1991 el Mayor Laith Yacub intuyó que algo importante estaba por ocurrir porque el Brigadier Jalifa llegó a su puesto de mando, y él entonces corrió a su puesto de control. Pocos minutos después los radares detectaron una gran cantidad de aviones enemigos que se aproximaban – sin duda los F-4G armados con HARM. La orden de Naji Jalifa no se hizo esperar: ¡Apaguen sus radares y enciendan los Sarab!
Yacub ordenó a su oficial de lanzamiento apagar el transmisor del radar, mientras él mismo presionaba los botones de encendido de sus dos señuelos. Estos estaban ubicados a 150 metros a la izquierda y a la derecha del centro de control. Segundos después, Laith vió como dos AGM-88 explotaban a cinco metros de uno y otro Sarab. Los apagó inmediatamente. Lo mismo le ocurrió a las otras baterías. Algunos de los señuelos fueron destruidos y otros dañados, pero la mitad permaneció intacta. E intactos también quedaron las antenas de todos los S-125. ¡El engaño había funcionado!
A las 16:30 hs los F-4G y los EF-111A comenzaron a retirarse, seguros de que habían dejado fuera de combate las defensas antiaéreas iraquíes, y la fuerza principal de ataque -dieciséis F-16C Fighting Falcon de la 401ª TFW armados con dos bombas de 907 kgs cada uno- empezó a cruzar la frontera saudita. Llegaron a las afueras de Bagdad a las 17:00 hs. Ocho de ellos se dirigieron hacia la fabrica eléctrica de Al-Dora, y el resto giró hacia el Proyecto 777, creyendo que el ataque iba a ser pan comido.
Jalifa advirtió a sus baterías sobre la llegada de los aviones de la USAF: ¡Aviones enemigos se aproximan, enfréntenlos como ensayamos! El Mayor Yacub ordenó a su jefe de lanzamiento girar la antena del radar en la dirección en que se aproximaban los F-16, y el mismo encendió el transmisor y el sistema de rastreo por TV. El oficial de lanzamiento enganchó a un Fighting Falcon a 15 kms, y presionó el botón de lanzamiento. Unos segundos más tarde los dos misiles Pechora partieron hacia su blanco. En la cabina de su F-16C BuNo 87-0228 el Mayor Jeffrey S. Tice se llevó la sorpresa más desagradable de su vida. Intentó varias maniobras evasivas, pero fue inútil: quince segundos después de haber sido lanzados, ambos S-125 hicieron impacto directo en su avión. Yacub y sus hombres vieron ambas explosiones  en la pantalla de TV, y estallaron en gritos y abrazos de alegría. Tice a duras penas alcanzó a eyectarse de su F-16 antes de que este se desintegrara, y fue capturado por beduinos iraquíes. Las otras baterías de S-125 obligaron a los restantes siete F-16 a lanzar su letal carga antes de tiempo para poder eludir los misiles. Todas las bombas cayeron fuera del muro que marcaba el perímetro del complejo.
Una escena similar ocurría a pocos kilómetros de allí sobre Al-Dora. Los F-16 súbitamente se encontraron con que las baterías SAM, las cuales creían eliminadas por los F-4G, estaban indemnes. Si bien dos de los Fighting Falcon pudieron destruir una chimenea y uno de los generadores, el resto se deshizo de su carga y trató de huir hacia el sur. Uno no lo logró: fue enganchado por la 43ª Batería del Mayor Faiez, la cual le disparó dos misiles. Su piloto, el Capitán Harry M. Roberts (614° TFS, 401ª TFW), pudo eludir el primero, pero el segundo Pechora dio de lleno en su F-16C BuNo 87-0257. Roberts pudo controlar su aparato, pero cuando estaba a mitad de camino entre Bagdad y la frontera saudí de pronto la turbina de su malograda aeronave se detuvo, y Roberts tuvo que eyectarse, siendo hecho prisionero pocos minutos después.
Este fue solo uno de los muchos casos en que el empleo de los sarab frustró ataques de la USAF contra objetivos estratégicos iraquíes. Queda claro que los Wild Weasel y los HARM no dejaron ciega a la FDAAI. Esta siguió resistiendo hasta el final. De hecho, los técnicos norteamericanos solo se enteraron que estos señuelos eran lo que había frustrado tantos de sus ataques con misiles HARM en 1991, cuando ocuparon todo Iraq en 2003 y tuvieron acceso a los sarab sobrevivientes.


Conclusión

Después de analizar mucha de la bibliografía estadounidense acerca de la Guerra del Golfo de 1991, y también sobre otros conflictos asimétricos que le siguieron (por ejemplo, la Guerra de Kosovo de 1999), se nota que la gran mayoría de los autores norteamericanos piensan que las Fuerzas Armadas de EE UU tienen una capacidad extra de innovación dada por la superioridad del American way of life, que es eso lo que les da la victoria. A estos investigadores les gusta pensar que la mencionada capacidad innovativa es una diferencia esencial, que no está presente en las fuerzas armadas de los rogue countries como fueron Iraq y Yugoslavia, y como aún lo son Siria, el Libano de Hezbollah, Irán y Corea del Norte.
Esta concepción es, cuando menos, tendenciosa. El profesionalismo, la capacidad de aprender, mejorar, innovar, anticipar y cambiar tácticas, no son para nada prerrogativas norteamericanas u occidentales. Este artículo está lleno de ejemplos de que tales virtudes también estaban presentes en el personal militar iraquí en 1991. La diferencia entre norteamericanos e iraquíes no fue una diferencia esencial sino de grado. Estados Unidos y sus aliados de la Coalición ganaron la Guerra del Golfo porque por medio de un embargo internacional habían bloqueado la capacidad de Iraq de adquirir nuevas armas, y porque tenían una gran ventaja numérica y tecnológica, y sin duda aprovecharon a fondo esa ventaja. Pero también es claro que la FAI y la FDAAI lucharon muchísimo mejor de lo que el público en Occidente piensa, y más todavía de lo que el Pentágono está dispuesto a admitir.


Fuentes:

•   Dirassa an al ta’irat al mua’dia al muskata fi Um Al Ma’arik (Lista de aviones enemigos derribados durante la Madre de Todas las Batallas), Sección 1 – publicado por el Ministerio de Defensa iraquí, junio de 2000.
•   Asaleeb na Ta’bi’at al Tayran al Mu’adi fi Um Al Ma’arik (Métodos y Tácticas utilizados por las fuerzas aéreas enemigas durante la Madre de Todas las Batallas), Sección 1 – publicado por el Ministerio de Defensa iraquí, fines de 1991.
•   Gulf War Air Power Survey, Vol.5. Públicado por el US DoD.
•   Operation Desert Storm, Evaluation of the Air Campaign (GAO/NSIAD-97-134). Publicado por el US GAO (General Accounting Office), 12 de junio de 1997.
•   Entrevistas a los Mayores Jameel Sayhood, Hameed y Leith Yacub, efectuadas por Ahmad Sadik.

Ver también:
Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
(en inglés)





« Última modificación: 28 Octubre 2017, 16:44:14 por Rusoargentino » En línea
iaquil
Moderator foro RKKA
General Mayor
*

Karma: 542
Mensajes: 1412


De 10, 5 son la mitad.


« Respuesta #9 : 16 Octubre 2017, 18:21:02 »

Coño Ruso...¡qué buen artículo! Gracias por compartirlo aquí.
En línea
OverG
Colaborador portal RKKA
Polkovnik
*

Karma: 368
Mensajes: 1051



« Respuesta #10 : 17 Octubre 2017, 00:47:29 »

Gracias Diego, muy buen artículo.

Se te agradece siempre tu buen trabajo e investigación.
« Última modificación: 17 Octubre 2017, 00:49:49 por OverG » En línea
Lavréntiy
Colaborador portal RKKA
Mariscal
*

Karma: 915
Mensajes: 6546


Narkom NKVD


« Respuesta #11 : 17 Octubre 2017, 01:06:03 »

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
Mirando con más detalle algunos hilos que rara vez visito del foro, encontré este. Como saben en su momento investigué el tema junto con el iraquí Ahmad Sadik (que hizo la parte más importante y valiosa del estudio al investigar el lado iraquí), así que me parece más que adecuado volver a publicar aquí el artículo

Excelente como siempre, camarada Rusoargentino! Aqui teneis otros excelentes trabajos hechos por nuestro camarada (los títulos son pinchables):

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

OverG, te curraste este libro en su momento...

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Todo de lectura obligatoria.

Abrazos a todos.
En línea

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
Amador Urssus
Moderator foro RKKA
Mariscal
*

Karma: 875
Mensajes: 3077



WWW
« Respuesta #12 : 17 Octubre 2017, 13:23:26 »

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
Mirando con más detalle algunos hilos que rara vez visito del foro, encontré este. Como saben en su momento investigué el tema junto con el iraquí Ahmad Sadik (que hizo la parte más importante y valiosa del estudio al investigar el lado iraquí), así que me parece más que adecuado volver a publicar aquí el artículo:


Desmitificando la Guerra del Golfo

...

Leído.

(Los yankis omitiendo y/o mintiendo, lo de siempre... y su/el rebaño occidental balando, idem oe oe oe)

En línea

Stalin alza, limpia, construye, fortifica, preserva, mira, protege, alimenta, pero también castiga. Y esto es cuanto quería deciros, camaradas: hace falta el castigo. Neruda

Las ideas son más poderosas que las armas. Nosotros no dejamos que nuestros enemigos tengan armas, ¿por qué dejaríamos que tuvieran ideas?. IVD
NOVODVORSKAYA S
Mariscal
*

Karma: 950
Mensajes: 4286



« Respuesta #13 : 17 Octubre 2017, 13:59:48 »

Genial, muchas gracias Rusoargentino  Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
En línea

El tanque Armata y los patriotas ucranianos tienen una cosa en comun: la torre deshabitada.

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar

Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
Bolchevique_BCN
Moderator foro RKKA
Mayor
*

Karma: 256
Mensajes: 736



« Respuesta #14 : 17 Octubre 2017, 17:38:05 »

Grandísimos artículos, muchas gracias camaradas.  Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar Para ver el contenido hay que estar registrado. Registrar o Entrar
En línea
Páginas: [1] 2   Ir Arriba
  Imprimir  
 
Ir a:  

VVS RKKA Topsites List
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines XHTML 1.0 válido! CSS válido!